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Google's Take Your Classroom to Work Day promo

Take Your Child to Work Day gives a sense of what parents' jobs are like, but Google knows that kids can't always afford go to the office. Accordingly, the company is bringing the office to the kids through its first-ever Take Your Classroom to Work Day. The April 24th initiative uses Hangouts video chats to show workplaces that even the luckiest students might never see in person, such as the Chicago Bulls' locker room and the Stan Winston School of Special Effects. The first internet-based field trips are already underway, but you can check out Google's schedule for upcoming excursions. Suffice it to say that we're a little jealous -- where were these educational adventures when we were in school?

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Key Speakers At The Google I/O Annual Developers Conference

Vic Gundotra, who is known for his role in building Google's social network, has announced that he's leaving the company after a tenure of eight years. Appropriately, Gundotra made his intentions known in a post on Google+, saying that "now is the time for a new journey, a continuation." He was careful not to mention any specifics about what lies ahead, other than stating that he's "excited about what's next." Gundotra came to Google in 2007 and helped pioneer the company's push into the mobile space by leading the mobile and developer relations teams. He headed up the Google+ project after Buzz was scrapped, which at the time was considered a risky move.

We're unsure of the circumstances behind Gundotra's departure, but an anonymous person recently posted on Secret that he was interviewing elsewhere. Regardless of what happened behind the scenes, the show must go on; what's in store for the social network now? Reports from GigaOm and Re/Code say that Dave Besbris, VP of Engineering for Google+, will fill the vacancy. (Update: Google has confirmed to us that this is true.) CEO Larry Page also took to G+ to offer his thanks for Gundotra's efforts over the years, mentioning that "we'll continue working hard to build great new experiences for the ever increasing number of Google+ fans."

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Last year Opera introduced Coast, a simple mobile browser designed specifically for the iPad, and today it brought the same unique experience to the iPhone. Coast is a little different than Chrome or Safari, and streamlines browsing by organizing shortcuts to sites on menu pages like they're apps. Think of it like your phone's home screen, except exclusively for the internet. It's intentionally pretty barebones, and doesn't have much besides those site icons -- so no address bar or back button. While the stripped down browser may sound a bit restricting at first, we've been testing the iPhone app for a few days and have found it makes getting to your favorite sites a lot easier.

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Google offered Glass to the public as part of a one day sale not long ago. Now it seems that anyone can order one again without an invite. There's been no announcement so far, no fan fair -- a few Redditors just happened to discover that you can head straight to the order page and add one to your cart. We've tried it from multiple accounts that we can confirm did not sign up for the Explorer program, so it appears that Glass is legitimately available to anyone with a Google account. We've reached out to Mountain View for comment and we'll let you know as soon as we hear back. In the meantime you can go order your own Explorer Edition unit now. So long as you're comfortable coughing up the $1,500 asking price, of course.

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Lyft blazing down the highway

Lyft isn't about to be outdone by its rapidly growing ridesharing competition. The on-demand transportation outfit has just launched service in 24 new US cities, all in one day -- enough to give it more American coverage than its rivals, at 60 cities in total. The expansion mostly covers notable mid-sized urban areas like Jacksonville, Kansas City and Memphis; you can check out the full list below to see if you're covered. The rollout will still leave many Americans hailing taxis, but it's good news for those who want multiple ridesharing choices when they venture beyond the largest population hubs.

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When I showed Sol to my family, they all got a bit confused. My dad asked why I was testing a toolbox for Engadget, while my sister took one look at it and said "Bumblebee." If you peek at the images below, you'll understand why: This solar-powered laptop does resemble a hardware tool case. And yes, it looks like a Transformer too.

Nobody would call Sol "sleek." It's big, bulky and measures more than two inches in depth at its thickest part -- a look that calls to mind Panasonic's Toughbook series. Indeed, Sol was designed to be more durable than your average gadget, which makes sense since it's mainly aimed at travelers and field scientists. In fact, everything about it (even the chemical composition of the plastic) was meant to last through heat. It's also durable enough to survive a fall -- good news for Sol's target audience. Compared to other rugged laptops, though, Sol's quite affordable (with a price tag of $375 to $400, depending on the market), as it was designed for use in developing countries. So how is it in use? After two weeks of testing Sol in the Philippines, I'm finally ready to weigh in.

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Chances are your phone doesn't have a built-in projector -- and it never will. But there's at least a small subset of the Chinese market that apparently has a need for an entry-level smartphone capable of projecting dim videos and presentation slides onto a flat surface. The Galaxy Beam 2 sports a 1.2GHz quad-core processor, 1 gig of RAM and an underwhelming 800x480-pixel 4.66-inch display. The battery tops out at 2,600 mAh of juice, so if you're thinking of planning a smartphone movie marathon you might want to bring the charger along. It launched today on China Mobile's 3G network (with pricing TBA), and while Samsung has yet to detail an international release, it's unlikely that we'll ever see the second-generation Beam on this end of the Pacific.

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Leica's been making cameras for a full century this year, and to celebrate, it's just now getting around to releasing an interchangeable-lens camera that you might actually be able to afford... until you factor in the glass. Priced around $1,850 (without a lens), the T looks like a camera that you might want to own. Its core is chiseled from a solid brick of aluminum, resulting in a beautiful body (that's equally durable). There's a 16-megapixel APS-C sensor, a 3.7-inch high-res touchscreen, a 12,500 top ISO, 1080p video capture, a 5 fps continuous shooting mode and a pair of top-mounted control wheels for adjusting exposure. There's also integrated WiFi, and you can pop on an optional electronic viewfinder, if that's your thing.

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Twitter's made serious efforts to turn itself into more than just a social network: it wants to be the go-to tool for journalists searching for breaking news. Naturally, it makes sense for Facebook to follow suit as the two continue to play feature tag. Newswire is Zuckerberg & co.'s answer to Dataminr for News. It aggregates shared stories, photos and status updates that might be of interest to journalists and news organizations.

This isn't just some haphazard collection of BuzzFeed lists and conspiracy blogs ,though. The service is powered by Storyful, a company that specializes in filtering out the noise and delivering "valuable content" through a social newswire service.

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Moving a game from one platform to another -- from iOS to PC, from Xbox One to PlayStation 4 -- isn't as easy as it seems. Just change a few button prompts and you're all set, right? Not so much. There's a lot to consider: how do you control the game (mouse/keyboard/gamepad/touch/etc.)? does it sync up with online leaderboards? does it have the proper logos/attribution? Epic Games' Unreal Engine 4 aims to circumvent as much of that as possible, and today it's enabling two more platforms: Xbox One and PlayStation 4. In terms of Xbox One peripheral support, that includes Kinect, and in terms of PlayStation 4 peripheral support, that includes the Project Morpheus virtual reality headset.

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